We’re all unlucky in love sometimes. When I am, I go jogging. The body loses water when you jog, so you have none left for tears.
Chungking Express

art by Cy Twonbly, 1993
http://www.cytwombly.info/
pentacosiarca asked: Would you date me? I’m sorry dear, but I’ve already got someone I’m incredibly happy with.  Wish you all the best (:

pentacosiarca asked: Would you date me?

I’m sorry dear, but I’ve already got someone I’m incredibly happy with. 

Wish you all the best (:

“I asked the Zebra, are you black with white stripes? Or white with black stripes? And the zebra asked me, Are you good with bad habits? Or are you bad with good habits? Are you noisy with quiet times? Or are you quiet with noisy times? Are you happy with some sad days? Or are you sad with some happy days? Are you neat with some sloppy ways? Or are you sloppy with some neat ways? And on and on and on and on and on and on he went. I’ll never ask a zebra about stripes…again. -Shel Silverstein”
lynch
The difficulties of neuroscience research Back in December, UCL Neuroscientist Brain Butterworth was asked the following question on BBC radio 4’s excellent show, The Infinite Monkey Cage: Is the brain a machine described by the laws of physics that runs algorithms and little more? His answer: I think physics is not a very good model here. What we’re talking about is not rocket science, it’s actually much more complicated than that. Rocket science is a matter of getting matter, a bunch of atoms, from point A to point B. This is what people do when they send a rocket into space. Now imagine that each of those atoms had a mind of its own and it was actually thinking about what the other atoms were thinking about. And in particular, there’s the problem of what I call the ‘Dostoyevsky question’.  It goes something like this: if everybody else thinks that I’m going from A to B, and even though going to B would actually be quite good for me, I am not going to go because I want to show that I am not constrained by the laws of physics. I am not constrained by what’s good for me. I have free will, and so I am going to do what I want, even though it’s self-destructive. The other problem is that every brain is different. The reason why brains are different has got to do with genes that go to build it, with the experiences that it has. So we’re not going to have a theory of ‘The Brains”, we’re going to have to have a theory of brains, and why your brain is different from my brain. That seems to be a massively, massively more complex problem than just getting a rocket from point A to point B, or from figuring out what a black hole is which seems trivial by comparison. 

The difficulties of neuroscience research

Back in December, UCL Neuroscientist Brain Butterworth was asked the following question on BBC radio 4’s excellent show, The Infinite Monkey Cage:

Is the brain a machine described by the laws of physics that runs algorithms and little more?

His answer:

I think physics is not a very good model here. What we’re talking about is not rocket science, it’s actually much more complicated than that. Rocket science is a matter of getting matter, a bunch of atoms, from point A to point B. This is what people do when they send a rocket into space. Now imagine that each of those atoms had a mind of its own and it was actually thinking about what the other atoms were thinking about. And in particular, there’s the problem of what I call the ‘Dostoyevsky question’.  It goes something like this: if everybody else thinks that I’m going from A to B, and even though going to B would actually be quite good for me, I am not going to go because I want to show that I am not constrained by the laws of physics. I am not constrained by what’s good for me. I have free will, and so I am going to do what I want, even though it’s self-destructive. The other problem is that every brain is different. The reason why brains are different has got to do with genes that go to build it, with the experiences that it has. So we’re not going to have a theory of ‘The Brains”, we’re going to have to have a theory of brains, and why your brain is different from my brain. That seems to be a massively, massively more complex problem than just getting a rocket from point A to point B, or from figuring out what a black hole is which seems trivial by comparison.